Local nurse retires from Chapel Hill Community after 43 years

Kay Flanagan, assistant director of nursing at Chapel Hill Community retiringCANAL FULTON, Ohio [Sept. 10, 2019] – Wednesday, Aug. 28 was like any other work day for Kay Flanagan, assistant director of nursing at Chapel Hill Community, part of the United Church Homes senior living network. She arrived for her shift early and guided staff through the day’s tasks of caring for residents. However, this shift would be her last.

In some ways, Flanagan’s last shift was very different from a typical workday. She cleaned out her office, spent time visiting with residents and family members and passed along notebooks of information to staff who would take over her duties moving forward.

Flanagan, a resident of East Canton, retired from Chapel Hill after 43 years of dedicated service. She has been described by her co-workers and supervisors as diligent, dedicated and a fierce advocate for residents and staff.

“Kay was the first nurse I worked with,” said Pat Tallman, an activities assistant, who has worked at Chapel Hill for 40 years. “She is so knowledgeable about the medical field. There was no one more dedicated to her role than Kay.”

Executive Director Debbie Durbin said Flanagan is the unofficial historian of Chapel Hill Community. Flanagan was introduced to the community when she was just 12 years old in 1966, when she visited Chapel Hill with a choir from her church, St. Paul’s United Church of Christ.

Flanagan graduated in 1975 from Akron General Medical School of Nursing. Her first position at Chapel Hill was as staff nurse when Rev. Robert Hegnauer was administrator. Rev. Hegnauer had been Flanagan’s pastor and baptized her as a baby.

Over the years, Flanagan has been a constant through numerous additions and renovations. She has worked with at least 11 administrators and 11 directors of nursing (DON). Flanagan became acting DON between each new leader. Flanagan has overseen more than 7,000 admissions and cared for thousands of residents, their families and staff.

“Her car was the first car I saw in the parking lot in the morning and the last car remaining in the parking lot at night,” Durbin said. “Kay has become part of the fabric and history of Chapel Hill Community.”

When asked what makes Chapel Hill unique, Flanagan did not hesitate. “The people – residents, families and staff. United Church Homes has always been a front-runner in the long-term care profession. One of the best things UCH ever did for staff is the retirement plan. Without it, I would not have been able to retire.”

As for advice Flanagan has for new nurses, she encouraged them to look for the bright side in all they do. “There will be few perfect days but strive to make every day the best that it can be,” she said.

Marc Dye, a registered nurse, former neighborhood manager and staff member for three years, has been promoted to assistant DON.

For more information about Chapel Hill Community, visit chapelhillcommunity.org.

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About Chapel Hill Community: Chapel Hill Community offers independent and assisted living, long-term skilled care, short-term rehabilitation and memory care on a beautiful campus outside Canal Fulton, Ohio. As part of the United Church Homes family of senior living communities, its mission is to transform aging by building a culture of community, wholeness and peace.

Chapel Hill Community Welcomes Public for Walk with a Doc

CANAL FULTON, Ohio [Aug. 28, 2019] – Area residents are invited to Chapel Hill Community’s monthly Walk with a Doc program at 10 a.m. Monday, Sept. 2 at Chapel Hill’s Basler Community Building, 12200 Strausser St. NW, Canal Fulton.

Walk with a Doc is a national nonprofit organization whose mission is to encourage healthy physical activity in people of all ages, reversing the consequences of a sedentary lifestyle and improving the health and well-being of the country.

Participation is free. Register by contacting Jerry Martin at 330-854-4177. Pre-registration is not required but preferred.

Walkers will enjoy a rejuvenating walk with Dr. Rao and other healthcare professionals, who will provide support to participants and answer questions during the walk.

For more information about Chapel Hill Community, visit chapelhillcommunity.org.

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About Chapel Hill Community: Chapel Hill Community offers independent and assisted living, long-term skilled care, short-term rehabilitation and memory care on a beautiful campus outside Canal Fulton, Ohio. As part of the United Church Homes family of senior living communities, its mission is to transform aging by building a culture of community, wholeness and peace.

Chapel Hill to celebrate National Skilled Nursing Care Week

CANAL FULTON [April 29, 2019] – Chapel Hill Community in Canal Fulton is excited to participate in National Skilled Nursing Care Week, which will be held May 12 – 18.

The NSNCW 2019 theme, “Live Soulfully,” will celebrate skilled nursing centers and their residents and staff by showcasing how they achieve happy minds and healthy souls. The theme fits well with United Church Homes’ mission and vision to provide care to the whole person including mind, body and spirit, which includes providing full-time chaplains at all UCH senior living communities.

Below is the calendar of events for National Skilled Nursing Care Week:

  • Sunday, May 12
    9:30 a.m., worship service in the chapel with Rev. Erin Proie
    1 p.m., entertainer Jill Burke in the Grand Lobby
    2 p.m., Mother’s Day Social in the activities room with a mother’s blessing
  • Monday, May 13
    10 a.m., Walk with the Doc at Basler Community Center. Topic: Understanding your blood pressure. Afterward, join Dr. Rao for a brisk walk around the Kroft Common Circle
    2:30 p.m., Elvis singing gospel hits and other favorites in the Grand Lobby
  • Tuesday, May 14
    9:15 a.m., ceramics in the craft room
    1 p.m., bell choir in the Grand Lobby
    2:30 p.m., Tap Katz in the Grand Lobby
  • Wednesday, May 15
    10 a.m. to 1 p.m., all-building cookout
    10 – 3:30 p.m., massage for staff in the rec room on the garden level
    10 a.m. – 1 p.m., all-building cookout in the rec room/courtyard
  • Thursday, May 16
    2 – 4 p.m., The Toys That Time Forgot in the Grand Lobby, presenting toy commercials from the 1950s and ’60s.
  • Saturday, May 18
    12 – 3 p.m., Stark County Humane Society adoption event in the rec room/courtyard
    1 p.m., Blessing of the Pets

Established an as annual, week-long observance by the American Health Care Association in 1967, NSNCW, formerly known as National Nursing Home Week, provides an opportunity to recognize the role of skilled nursing care centers in caring for America’s older adults and people with disabilities.

For more information about Chapel Hill, visit unitedchurchhomes.org/chapel-hill.

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About Chapel Hill Community:  Chapel Hill Community offers independent and assisted living, long-term skilled care, short-term rehabilitation and memory care on a beautiful campus outside Canal Fulton, Ohio.

Chapel Hill’s Inaugural Resident Giving Campaign Was a Big Success

Inaugural resident giving campaign a big success - leads to sweet treat

Through the hot summer months, Chapel Hill Community residents dreamed of frozen custard, but the community didn’t have a custard machine. Members of the Chapel Hill Residents Council decided this was an excellent project to tackle. Their plan was to raise the money for the custard machine and also encourage donations toward benevolent care. An anonymous donor offered to match, dollar for dollar, residents’ contributions up to $10,000. In less than two months, residents had contributed the money and more — for a total of $23,000! In a surprising turn of events, most donors chose to give to benevolent care above all else. In the end, residents funded the custard machine and benevolent care as well as pastoral care and a pair of tribute benches for all to enjoy.

Chapel Hill Community Resident Delores Voltz

 

Dolores Voltz, Chapel Hill resident

Delores is a resident of United Church Homes’ Chapel Hill Community in Canal Fulton, Ohio. Her connections to the community go back to her early adulthood in 1963, when her family helped prepare the earth for what would become Chapel Hill.

Delores’ father, Leonard Hegnauer, a minister, helped lay part of the foundation. He served as the building chairman. Delores’ brother, Bob Hegnauer, served as administrator of Chapel Hill, leading the community through its early years. Her sister, Naomi, lived there about 10 years ago.

Chapel Hill Marketing Director Jerry Martin recalled, “We were looking at the Memory Wall, and Delores pointed to a photo of herself and her husband, Don, helping to clear the land where Chapel Hill would be built.”

Delores’ daughter, Jan Boylan, and her three siblings have fond memories of family gatherings, including Thanksgiving dinners, held at Chapel Hill’s community spaces.

Delores was a member of Lowell United Church of Christ, one of Chapel Hill’s founding churches. Once per year, church members would visit Chapel Hill for spring cleaning day, when they made improvements to Chapel Hill’s outdoor spaces.

In 1984, Delores and her husband moved to Florida. After his death in June 1992, Delores moved back to the Canal Fulton area to be closer to family. Later, when she began to need support, she decided to move to Chapel Hill.

“As soon as I walked in, everyone was so friendly,” Delores said. “It was so natural to live here.”

Jan said there was no other place for her mother.

“This is just where she wanted to be,” Jan said. “It’s got a pretty setting. I don’t know of anywhere prettier.”

Seeing Delores surrounded by friends and participating in activities here, it’s obvious she’s returned home.

UCH Honors Recipients with Awards for Leadership, Dedication and Values

Late fall of 2018 proved a time to lift up those who embody the spirit of United Church Homes, as eight individuals accepted awards for their exemplary service to UCH.

“We have a passion for developing and supporting leadership here,” President and CEO Rev. Kenneth Daniel said. “We’ve been blessed over the years with people giving time and talent, as volunteers, donors and staff, and we value this time to recognize their impactful contributions to our organization.”


Rev. Dr. Robert Diller Legacy Leadership Award – Rev. John Rainey

John Rainey Rev Dr Diller AwardThe Legacy Leadership Award is named after the late Rev. Dr. Robert Diller, who joined the UCH Board of Directors in 1945. Over the next 31 years, he helped move the organization from a single location that served 125 residents to include five communities serving over 800 individuals. Rev. Diller served as the first president and CEO of United Church Homes. The award honors those whose leadership commitment to UCH echoes Rev. Dr. Diller’s high levels of vision, perseverance and faith.

Rev. John Rainey is the second recipient of the award, and like Rev. Dr. Diller, his service to UCH has spanned decades, starting in the mid-1940s when he was a young boy. He and his family supplied canned food from their garden to the Evangelical and Reformed Home for the Aged in Upper Sandusky, Ohio (currently known as UCH’s Fairhaven Community). Fast-forward to 1970 when John decided to run for the UCH Board. He secured the spot and spent the next 24 years as a Board member, once serving as secretary, which he considered one of the most challenging and enjoyable jobs he’s had.

Through the years, John also had the opportunity to forge a relationship with one of UCH’s greatest benefactors, Ruth Frost Parker. Ruth, who was on the UCH Board with John, didn’t drive, so he transported her to and from Board meetings. The time spent together resulted in many enlightening and enjoyable conversations. A few years later, John attended the groundbreaking of UCH’s Parkvue Community in Sandusky, Ohio, where he now resides with his husband, Gene Finnegan. To this day, John’s service to United Church Homes continues. Together with Gene, he volunteers at the front desk and serves as an ambassador to new residents. The two also host Parkvue’s Happy Hour, deliver mail to residents and give campus tours upon request. John is also an accomplished quilter and makes teddy bears as gifts.

On top of all that, Parkvue Director of Resident Services Shannon Graver said, “Gene and John walk the halls or campus (depending on weather) for exercise every day and report anything that should be brought to my attention.

“I genuinely love those two,” she added. “They are wonderful advocates for UCH and also a great support to me!”


President’s Award of Distinction – Rev. Beth Long-Higgins

The President’s Award of Distinction honors people within UCH who significantly advance its mission to transform aging by building a culture of community, wholeness and peace.

“The purpose is to celebrate people who have done something of such merit and impact that it creates transformative change in some way,” Rev. Daniel said.

This is certainly true of Rev. Beth Long-Higgins.

Beth Long Higgins Pres Award of DistinctionBeth’s long history with United Church Homes began in the late 1960s at Chapel Hill Community when her church hosted one month’s birthday celebrations for residents. In 1974, her grandparents moved into Chapel Hill, living there until their deaths in 1981. For many years, Beth and her husband served as copastors at David’s United Church of Christ in Canal Winchester. One reason they were interested in the congregation was because of its involvement with United Church Homes’ leadership. Beth spent six years on the UCH Board, chairing the housing and long-range planning committees. In 2013, she joined the UCH staff as director of church and community relations. Now she’s the executive director of the Ruth Frost Parker Center for Abundant Aging.

During Beth’s tenure, she led the reinvigoration of UCH’s relationships with churches that have historically supported and formed UCH communities. Also in the years since Beth joined the staff, the organization developed its mission, vision and core values, which Beth helped write. More recently, she constructed the Community Benefits Program that encourages and records how each UCH community engages with their greater local communities.

Rev. Daniel surprised Beth with the award, saying, “Perhaps no one is more deserving of this award than Beth.”


LUV Awards – United Church Homes Staff Members

The Living UCH Values (LUV) Award honors staff members who every day demonstrate the highest commitment to United Church Homes’ core values of compassion, hospitality, respect, integrity, stewardship and transparency. Nominations for the award come from fellow staff members, supervisors, volunteers, friends or family members.

The 2018 winners include Monica Smiley and Linda Bell, Chapel Hill Community; Sharon Frisch, Fairhaven Community; Barb Mugrage, Harmar Place; Kevin Sanders, Parkvue Community; and Jen Wilson, Trinity Community.

“We are pleased to honor these outstanding staff members for their dedication to their residents and all those they come into contact with,” said Alyson Issler, corporate director of human resources.

LUV Award Winners 2019

Smiley, Bell recognized with LUV Award at Chapel Hill Community

Monica SmileyThe LUV Award recognizes and honors staff members who demonstrate the highest commitment to United Church Homes’ core values of compassion, hospitality, respect, integrity, stewardship and transparency. Nominations may be made by staff members, volunteers, residents or their families.

Monica was nominated for her compassion toward residents, families and co-workers. She has been working at Chapel Hill for nearly one year, but in her short tenure, Monica has stolen the hearts of new residents, making them feel welcomed and comfortable in their new home, and working to show them that she cares for their needs and wants.

“Monica is a natural at her job,” Chapel Hill Executive Director Debbie Durbin said.

Linda has worked at Chapel Hill for 15 years and was nominated based on her demonstration of all six UCH core values. Linda is described as a hero at Chapel Hill. Residents, visitors and co-workers notice Linda’s hard work and determination to care for residents with high standards and patience. She also has taken on the challenge of helping to train new staff members.

“We are pleased to honor Monica and Linda for their dedication to their residents and all those they come into contact with at Chapel Hill Community,” said Alyson Issler, corporate director of human resources.

For more information about United Church Homes, visit unitedchurchhomes.org.

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About United Church Homes: United Church Homes is one of the nation’s largest providers of senior living services, with more than 74 senior living communities in 14 states and two Native American nations. Its Ruth Frost Parker Center for Abundant Aging brings together experts of various disciplines to collaborate on improving the quality of life for older adults.

Media Contact: Alissa Paolella, Communications Coordinator, 740.382.4885 or apaolella@uchinc.org

UCH communities recognized with Silver Quality Award

Chapel Hill, Fairhaven, Four Winds, Harmar Place and Trinity Community at Fairborn (formerly Patriot Ridge) communities and SEM Haven all received the distinction. In total, 166 skilled nursing care centers and assisted living communities made the list.

The awards will be presented to recipients during AHCA/NCAL’s 69th Annual Convention & Expo in San Diego, California, Oct. 7-10.

“I applaud this year’s Silver award recipients on this incredible achievement in quality,” said Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of AHCA/NCAL. “It is a privilege to recognize our member centers and communities that consistently make a positive impact on the lives of the patients and residents they serve.”

The award is the second of three distinctions possible through the AHCA/NCAL National Quality Award Program, which recognizes providers across the nation that have demonstrated their commitment to improving quality of care in long term and post-acute care.

Based on the core values and criteria of the nationally recognized Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, the association’s Quality Award program challenges member providers to achieve performance excellence through three progressive levels — Bronze, Silver and Gold. Members at the Silver award level develop and demonstrate effective approaches that help improve performance and quality outcomes.

“Being recognized with the Silver award is a significant accomplishment,” said Alana Wolfe, chair of the AHCA/NCAL National Quality Award Board of Overseers. “This year’s recipients have shown a dedication to assessing and implementing approaches that result in better outcomes. I commend them on this great achievement.”

This year’s Silver recipients can now advance in developing approaches that meet the criteria required for the Gold — Excellence in Quality Award. On May 31, the association announced the honorees of the Bronze — Commitment to Quality Award. A full list of Silver and Bronze recipients is available on the AHCA/NCAL Quality Award website here. Gold award recipients will be announced later this summer.

The program is sponsored by AHCA/NCAL Associate Business Members: First Quality, NRC Health, and Team TSI Corporation.

For more information about United Church Homes, visit unitedchurchhomes.org.

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About United Church Homes: United Church Homes, headquartered in Marion, Ohio, has been “Celebrating the Spirit” of seniors for more than a century. The faith-inspired nonprofit organization is one of the nation’s largest providers of senior living services, with more than 1,800 dedicated staff serving nearly 5,000 residents of all faiths in 74 senior living communities throughout 14 states and two Native American nations. UCH is in covenant with the United Church of Christ and welcomes residents of all faiths.

Media Contact: Alissa Paolella, Communications Coordinator, 740.382.4885 or apaolella@uchinc.org

Chapel Hill Paint Night 2018

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Predictive Algorithms, Artificial Intelligence: Tools for Early Intervention

 

According to a January 2017 report from management consulting firm NewVantage Partners, approximately 95 percent of Fortune 1000 companies have made significant investments in big data initiatives within the past five years.

The senior living profession is no exception. United Church Homes collects demographic and health data of its residents that can be used to predict the health status of a particular resident and improve care, said Chuck Mooney, senior vice president of senior living services at United Church Homes.

“To me, data analytics is like the unicorn — often talked about, rarely seen,” Chuck said. “Our cloud-based software platforms allow for a number of things. We’ve invested in hiring Clinical Informatics Manager Kathy Ely. She’s really our resident in-house PointClickCare (PCC) expert. The idea is to figure out how to use the data that we collect in more intelligent ways to, perhaps, predict falls, monitor diabetic status and be able to predict future illness for residents with diabetes.”

According to the PointClickCare blog, much data analytics comes from electronic health or medical records. This can include nursing assessment information, medication usage, hours and types of therapies and more. Documenting relevant data is one side of the coin. The other is the ability to analyze, understand and apply the data that has been collected. EMRs contain a treasure trove of data that can be leveraged to drive positive health outcomes among residents, increase staff engagement and drive operational efficiencies.

Every EMR contains a wealth of resident information, all of which can be analyzed to better understand individual resident care needs, to more efficiently schedule staff on different shifts and even to document whether certain meals have fallen out of favor among residents, according to PointClickCare.

The ultimate vision for UCH is to partner with a college gerontology program to provide an avenue for research-based data collection. Predictive algorithms and artificial intelligence technology can, for example, monitor a person’s movement patterns during a defined period of time. A change in these patterns may indicate a potential problem and, once identified, can be addressed quickly and efficiently.

“All providers in long-term care are required to collect the minimum data set (MDS),” Chuck said. “The MDS record is a very extensive clinical record that draws from the medical record and also from other sources, such as social work notes and chaplain/spiritual services. It captures all that information into a standard data set that is then reported to both the state and federal levels.”

Casper reports are quality metric reports generated from these data sets that have over 2,000 metrics with standard definitions. The reports lend themselves to benchmarking relative to UCH’s peers in senior living.

First Legacy Leadership Award Honors Rev. Dr. Paul Kiewit

Rev. Dr. Kiewit said he isn’t easily surprised, but he was surprised to receive this honor 72 years after his ordination.

“Thank you very much for all that you’ve done for me and all that you’ve given me this evening. I love you all,” Rev. Dr. Kiewit said.

The award comes after decades of supporting Chapel Hill residents. Rev. Dr. Kiewit first contributed to United Church Homes through his church when he was 17 years old, and his parents lived their final years at Chapel Hill Community. In the intervening years, he visited many parishioners who were residents of the community during his ministry in three congregations in eastern Ohio.

After his retirement from pastoral ministry in the 1990s, Rev. Dr. Kiewit joined the UCH Board of Directors, where he served as chair. He has also served as board chair for 22 of UCH’s Housing and Urban Development (HUD) communities, marking his relationship with the organization for over seven decades and his leadership surpassing the 25-year mark.

In 2001, Rev. Dr. Kiewit and his wife, Dorothy, were the 25th and 26th residents to move into Kroft Commons at Chapel Hill Community, where he has been a resident leader in the community in numerous ways — resident council president, donor and pastor to residents — and continues to sit on a UCH housing board. He is also the honorary chair for UCH’s Campaign for Abundant Life.

Together with his late wife, Rev. Dr. Kiewit supported the work at the Family Village Farm near Vellore, India, a United Church of Christ-related ministry providing homes for children and work for older adults. Rev. Dr. Kiewit has helped the residents of Chapel Hill connect with this ministry and for the past several years, residents collectively sponsor a child at the farm.

The award is named after the late Rev. Dr. Robert Diller, who began his service on the Board of Directors in 1945. Over the next 31 years, he helped move the organization from a single location that served 125 residents to include five communities serving over 800 individuals. He was named the first president and CEO of United Church Homes after serving as the superintendent of Fairhaven Community in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, from 1955–1964.

The new award honors those whose service to United Church Homes exemplifies high levels of vision, perseverance and faith. A legacy leader’s contribution makes a lasting impact, resulting in the significant expansion of the mission and realization of the vision, “where the Spirit creates Abundant Life in Community.”

Supporters honored at United Church Homes’ Chapel Hill Community event

St. John’s United Church of Christ received the Diakonie Award, which is presented to congregations that have demonstrated faithfulness, generosity, compassion and encouragement in their support of the UCH mission and its communities.

The church has teamed up with Chapel Hill Community to host a variety of ministries and offers a meal and food pantry, serving between 60 and 110 people each month. The congregation has been giving to Chapel Hill since its records began in the early 1980s. Since then, congregants have given 760 gifts totaling more than $97,500.

CH DAD 1Friends of Chapel Hill Auxiliary received the Spirit Award, which is presented to individuals who exemplify volunteerism, advocacy, inspiration and spirit for the residents of the UCH communities and their families.

The Friends is a group of volunteers, founded in 1964, just after Chapel Hill opened. The group meets monthly, and members share ideas for resident recreation and plan ways to raise money to help fulfill various resident needs.

John and Judy Kropf received the prestigious Ben M. Herbster Award. The award is presented to individuals who best exemplify the philosophy, leadership, philanthropic spirit and achievements of the late Dr. Ben M. Herbster. Herbster was the first president of the United Church of Christ after it formed in 1961.

The Kropfs have been devoted donors to Chapel Hill since the 1980s. Throughout these decades, they gave more than 40 gifts to support abundant aging for older adults served by United Church Homes.

CH DAD 3Rev. Kenneth Daniel, president and CEO of United Church Homes, said he is thankful for St. John’s, the auxiliary and the Kropfs for their engagement.

“Your service allows us to continue our mission at United Church Homes and create abundant life at Chapel Hill,” Daniel said.

For more information about United Church Homes, visit unitedchurchhomes.org.

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About United Church Homes: United Church Homes, headquartered in Marion, Ohio, has been “Celebrating the Spirit” of seniors for more than a century. The faith-based nonprofit organization is one of the nation’s largest providers of senior living services, with more than 1,800 dedicated staff serving nearly 5,000 residents of all faiths in 74 senior living communities throughout 14 states and two Native American nations. UCH is in covenant with the United Church of Christ and welcomes residents of all faiths.

Media Contact: Alissa Paolella, Communications Coordinator, 740.382.4885 or apaolella@uchinc.org

2018 UCH Golf Outing

 

United Church Homes 2018 Golf Outing

REGISTER BY SEPTEMBER 1

Schedule for the Day

Schedule for the Day

8:00 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:45 a.m. Call to Carts

9:00 a.m. Shotgun Start

Return to the clubhouse for lunch and prizes after tournament play.

How to Register

Register online:
Click Here

Register by email:
nlongmeier@uchinc.org

Register by phone:
740.382.4885 ask for Natalie


  • Registration: $100 per person
    (Register by September 1)
  • Raffle Tickets: 2 for $15

Sponsorship Levels

Sponsorship Opportunities

Become a Sponsor

Abundant Life Sponsor $5,000

  • Eight (8) registered golfers, breakfast, lunch, hosted drinks, mulligans and raffle tickets included
  • Event titled with sponsor name and logo on banner and event communications
  • Hole-in-one grand prize sponsor

Lunch Sponsor $2,500

  • Four (4) registered golfers, breakfast, lunch, hosted drinks, mulligans and raffle tickets included
  • Sponsor name and logo exclusively featured on banner in lunch area
  • Sponsor name and logo on banner and event communications

Golf Cart Sponsor $1,500

  • Four (4) registered golfers, breakfast, lunch, hosted drinks, mulligans and raffle tickets included
  • Sponsor name and logo featured on two beverage carts
  • Sponsor name and logo on banner and event communications

Practice Sponsor $500

  • Two (2) registered golfers, breakfast, lunch, hosted drinks, mulligans and raffle tickets included
  • Sponsor name featured on signs at driving range and practice green
  • Sponsor name and logo on banner and event communications

Door Prize Sponsor $100 or Gift Card

  • Sponsor of raffle item (gift cards/certificates) in honor or memory of an individual
  • Sponsor name on signs in door prize/raffle exhibit area

Residents Continue Ritual of Giving

 

In 2017, United Church Homes communities donated over $20,000 to local, national and international charities through worship service collections

Residents of Chapel Hill, Fairhaven, Parkvue and Trinity communities collectively gave more than $20,300 to local, national and international charities in 2017 through worship service collections. This practice has deep meaning for many people who choose to live at United Church Homes.

“The residents love to give,” said Rev. Dr. Becky King, chaplain at Fairhaven Community in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, and dean of chaplains at UCH. “One hundred percent of their gifts are given to charities of their choice. Some people bring coins; some people bring bills. Some are able to offer prayers as their gift.”

Many residents of Trinity Community of Beavercreek, Ohio, have a long history in the United Church of Christ, of which UCH is an affiliate. Rev. Dale Brown, chaplain at Trinity Community, said residents often advocate for contributions to the United Church of Christ’s Global Ministries to spread the word and cause of Christ to the world.

Other times, residents elect to give their contributions to local charities or nonprofit organizations, such as food banks, homeless and domestic violence ministries and organizations like the Alzheimer’s Association.

The faithful also help their peers by giving to the community’s Life Enrichment Fund. This fund provides resources for life enrichment, group outings and other resident needs.

“People will bring their bingo money. Even if they only can give four quarters, it’s extremely important to them,” said Rev. Cathy Lawrence, chaplain of Parkvue Community in Sandusky, Ohio.

Recently, at Chapel Hill Community in Canal Fulton, Ohio, residents made their gifts go further with a donor match for the local affiliate of Habitat for Humanity, said Rev. Erin McCreight, chaplain at Chapel Hill. Each year, they also sponsor a child for $500 through Family Village Farm in India’s child-elders sponsorship program.

Many of the chaplains share details about the giving from the organizations receiving the funding during mission moments in worship services.

Emily Howard, a chaplain intern at Fairhaven, said she was touched by the energy that giving sparks in residents.

“We’re each called as people living in a faith community to share what we have and give of ourselves, and we’re connected in that way. It’s part of our faith,” she said.

Chapel Hill Team Prepares for Annual Alzheimer’s Walk

Caroline James (left) at A Willy Wonka Experience for Grownups this winter in Canton

Caroline James, director of memory support at Chapel Hill Community and Stark County Walk to End Alzheimer’s event chair, joined about 500 other volunteers for the 2018 Alzheimer’s Association Leadership Summit in New Orleans in January to learn necessary skills to lead the Stark County walk to success. There, she learned about engagement for events, connected with peers and attended a networking event about volunteer power. General sessions included information about Alzheimer’s and stories about those living with the disease.

“This was a good way for me to grow as an event chair and volunteer and to grow the team at Chapel Hill,” James said. “We have people from Chapel Hill — staff and family members of those living with Alzheimer’s — who walk every year. Last year, some of the residents in our memory care neighborhood came and walked with us. The leadership summit was a great kickstart to the year and gave me a lot more ideas about how to be a better event chair and team captain.”

About 900 people attend the Stark County walk annually.

In addition, volunteers can sign up as virtual walkers who raise money outside the main event to find a cure for the disease.

The Chapel Hill Community Alzheimer’s Walk team has a goal to raise $2,800 this year for the Alzheimer’s Association.

James, who leads the memory care team at Chapel Hill, also has a personal connection to the disease.

“My Yiayia (grandmother in Greek) was recently diagnosed and we saw the early onset symptoms probably a year ago,” James said. “She was misplacing things in the house, forgetting to turn off the stove. One day, she drove to the grocery store and didn’t know how to get home. I didn’t have a personal connection for a while when I started working in long-term care, but I had residents battling the disease who I’m working with every day.”

Earlier this year, the Stark County Walk to End Alzheimer’s team hosted That Chocolate Bar — A Willy Wonka Experience for Grownups at a popup bar in Canton. The Alzheimer’s Association is leading the Pure Imagination Project, an awareness campaign about Gene Wilder who played Willy Wonka and passed away from Alzheimer’s disease.

For more information about how to support the Chapel Hill Community Alzheimer’s team, visit https://bit.ly/2JvLlb9.

For more information about United Church Homes, visit unitedchurchhomes.org.

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About United Church Homes: United Church Homes, based in Marion, Ohio, has been “Celebrating the Spirit” of seniors for more than a century. The nonprofit, faith-based organization is one of the nation’s largest providers of senior living services, with more than 1,800 dedicated staff serving nearly 5,000 residents of all faiths in 72 senior living communities throughout 14 states and two Native American nations. UCH is in covenant with the United Church of Christ and welcomes residents of all faiths.

Media Contact: Alissa Paolella, Communications Coordinator, 740.382.4885 or apaolella@uchinc.org

Volunteer Breaks through Noise of Alzheimer’s

This type of work is for perseverant and committed individuals who strive to make an impact in the lives of older adults. And every once in a while, they get to experience a breakthrough.

Patti Crookston, a resident of Kroft Commons independent living at Chapel Hill Community in Canal Fulton, Ohio, meets one-on-one with residents of the healthcare center. Just more than a year after moving to Chapel Hill, Patti, a retired Spanish teacher, is involved in the assisted living and memory support neighborhoods on the Chapel Hill campus by volunteering.

“I love volunteering,” Patti said. “I’m just using the talents that God gives me. I was looking for something to fill my time and my spirit.”

When Patti met Tom*, he immediately began speaking to her in Spanish. Before that, Tom was communicating in broken sentences. As a child, Tom’s family primarily spoke Spanish in their home. Patti learned much more about him once she began communicating in his native language.

“I found out from the aides and nurses that he looked forward to my visits,” Patti said. “I could get him to do anything they needed him to do. I would compromise with him and explain why it would help him to follow the nurses’ requests.”

Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have found evidence that the processing of music and language depend on the same brain systems. For Patti, that just makes sense.

“When you start thinking about how the brain functions, the idea is to keep your whole brain going,” she said. “Doing things like music and art and languages encompass the whole brain because you can use creativity. As a teacher, I would use music in the classroom because it would help students remember or help calm them.”

Patti hopes her story will spark interest in others to share their language skills with older adults living with dementia. “It’s about them. It’s not about me. If I could just help one person, I’ll know that I was able to make a difference.”

Patti is a volunteer with the evidence-based Comfort Matters program for dementia care that United Church Homes has begun rolling out at its healthcare communities. Chapel Hill was the first United Church Homes community and the 14th in the nation to become certified.

The community recently was named the 16th best senior living community in Ohio by U.S. News & World Report. On the campus of the life plan community are leaders who are dedicated to empowering people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

In December, Chapel Hill Memory Support Director Caroline James participated in a call center for
A Journey Through Alzheimer’s, the annual one-hour special by television station WCMH in Columbus. Caroline answered questions from people who are experiencing their own Alzheimer’s journeys with their loved ones.

United Church Homes was proud
to co-sponsor the special as a
leader in memory care support services in Ohio, and Caroline was an easy choice to represent United Church Homes.

“A lot of callers seemed to just want to be heard and get confirmation that they’re not alone,” Caroline said.

Chapel Hill Community, like other United Church Homes campuses that provide safe, secure memory care neighborhoods, offers three evidence-based life enrichment programs as part of its commitment to provide abundant life for those living with dementia. The programs are Music & Memory, Opening Minds Through Art (OMA) and Comfort Matters.

United Church Homes became a Music & Memory partner in 2015, with trained caregivers creating personalized music playlists on iPods for residents. The playlists can tap deep memories not lost to dementia and can reawaken residents, enabling those who are withdrawn to become social.

Next came OMA, an award-winning, intergenerational program for people with Alzheimer’s and dementia-related illnesses, designed to provide residents with the creative freedom to expand their choices and sense of control. OMA uses art and self-expression, coupled with person-directed care principles, to build a bridge across age and cognitive barriers.

United Church Homes has begun rolling out Comfort Matters training at its healthcare communities. Comfort Matters is a nationally recognized memory support program. It is a philosophy, a care practice and an evidenced-based accredited education program, offering a holistic and integrated approach to improve the quality of care and quality of life for people living with dementia.

Altogether, these programs offer hope and joy, opportunities for creative expression and a sense of peace for individuals and families.

And sometimes, a breakthrough occurs in the least expected places, including the weekly worship services led by staff chaplains. Chaplain Rev. Erin McCreight from Chapel Hill reflects that these are soothing experiences for people living with dementia. Residents join together to sing hymns and church camp songs. Sometimes, they will just begin singing their favorites.

At the end of each service, residents lift up joys and concerns in prayer.

“They’ll pray for each other and staff. It’s really moving. It feeds my soul,” Rev. Erin said.

*Name has been changed to respect the privacy of the individual

United Church Homes earns Platinum certification in LGBT cultural competency training

The certification, which will be valid for the remainder of 2017 and the 2018 calendar year, comes from Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders, commonly known as SAGE. The SAGECare program trains residential healthcare providers and others that work with and advocate for older adults.

“Many LGBT older adults may be uncomfortable or fearful being open about their identity or relationships. SAGECare training is a way to communicate that your community is invested in their well-being,” said Tim R. Johnston, Ph.D., director of National Projects at SAGE.

“SAGECare Platinum communities have trained at least 80 percent of their staff using SAGECare content, which means eight out of every 10 people that LGBT elder interacts with will have completed at least an hour of LGBT cultural competency training.”

United Church Homes’ Fairhaven Community (Upper Sandusky, Ohio), Harmar Place (Marietta, Ohio), Parkvue Community (Sandusky, Ohio) and Trinity Community (Beavercreek, Ohio) individually earned Platinum certification, meaning 80 percent of their employees completed one hour of LGBT aging training and 80 percent of executives and administrators completed four hours of LGBT aging training or four hours of “State of the Agency” consulting by SAGE.

Communities that earned gold-level certification (60 percent of employees, executives and administrators trained) were Four Winds Community (Jackson, Ohio) and Trinity Community at Fairborn (formerly Patriot Ridge) (Fairborn, Ohio). Silver-level certification, with 40 percent of employees, executives and administrators trained, went to Chapel Hill Community (Canal Fulton, Ohio), Glenwood Community (Marietta, Ohio) and Pilgrim Manor (Grand Rapids, Michigan).

United Church Homes also earned Platinum certification for 80 percent of its 1,800 staff members participating in the training the first time it was offered.

The only other organization in Ohio that is SAGECare-certified is the Alzheimer’s Association, with four of its regional offices having earned the Bronze-level certification. In Michigan, Pilgrim Manor joins six other agencies in its commitment to affirming and celebrating LGBT individuals.

By completing the training, United Church Homes and its senior living communities have demonstrated their commitment to affirm LGBT residents, staff members and all others who step onto its campuses. It is another step in the process that began in 2012 with United Church Homes becoming the first health and human services agency in the United Church of Christ to earn the Open and Affirming designation.

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About United Church Homes: United Church Homes, based in Marion, Ohio, has been “Celebrating the Spirit” of seniors for more than a century. The nonprofit, faith-based organization is one of the nation’s largest providers of senior living services, with more than 1,800 dedicated staff serving 4,700 residents of all faiths in 72 senior living communities throughout 14 states and two Native American nations. UCH is in covenant with the United Church of Christ and welcomes residents of all faiths.

Media Contact: Alissa Paolella, Communications Coordinator, 740.382.4885 or apaolella@uchinc.org

Seven UCH employees honored with 2017 LUV Award

 

United Church Homes honored seven of its employees with the 2017 Living UCH Values Award that recognizes those who demonstrate the highest commitment to our core values. All LUV Award winners received a certificate and community recognition. Pictured are LUV Award winners (front row, from left) Rebecca Snodgrass, Chapel Hill Community; Shelly Sheets, Four Winds Community; Carol Reep, Fairhaven Community; and Anna Kender, Trinity Community. Second row: Vice President of Human Resources Scott Slutz; Director of Major Gifts and Grants Alissa Clouse; LUV Award winners Sherry Shaver and Bonnie Chesser, both representing Harmar Place; and Rev. Kenneth Daniel, president and CEO. Award winner Heather Traxler, of Fairhaven Community, is not pictured.

UCH to sponsor NBC’s A Journey Through Alzheimer’s

I Want to Go Home; A Journey Through Alzheimer’s, hosted by WCMH-TV (NBC4) anchor Colleen Marshall, began in 2008 when her mother was battling the disease. Colleen’s mother died in 2016. She said she hopes the special helps families to find the comfort they need.

UCH leaders decided to co-sponsor the 2017 special after watching last year’s program.

“We want to support families caring for loved ones diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and other debilitating memory impairments. We want to be a resource for the community and share knowledge about new treatment options and innovative programs that will improve the quality of life for their loved ones,” said Chuck Mooney, senior vice president and chief operating officer of United Church Homes.

United Church Homes communities offer dementia care programs such as Music & Memory and Opening Minds through Art (OMA). UCH staff members also are trained in Comfort Matters dementia care, an award-winning palliative care program that improves the quality of life for people living with the disease.

UCH experts in memory care and long-term care will be at the station answering questions by phone from 7-8:15 p.m.

Caroline James, memory support director at Chapel Hill Community in Canal Fulton, Ohio, is happy UCH is co-sponsoring the program.

“It gives us an opportunity to showcase what we do as a company. We all want the very best for our residents and their family members,” Caroline said.

Amy Kotterman, director of hospitality at UCH, helped to develop a partnership with the Beatitudes Campus in Phoenix, Arizona, which assisted as staff at three United Church Homes communities implemented Comfort Matters, a philosophy, care practice and dementia education program.

The training has helped staff to better care for residents with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

“United Church Homes recognizes that person-directed care is essential when it comes to working with residents living with dementia. The more we know the person, the better equipped we are to take care of them and provide a high quality of life, as well as abundant life,” Amy said.

kotterman 5609The special will allow staff an opportunity to educate others about dementia and how to care for those with dementia.

“We have a responsibility to share what we know to help make the journey a little easier for everyone,” Amy said.

“Dementia has been referred to as an ‘invisible’ disease, meaning people look the same, yet the brain is changing due to deterioration as the disease progresses,” Amy said. “It is important for families to find a community that can meet the needs of the whole person, meaning physical, emotional and spiritual needs.”

Chapel Hill Chaplain Retires After 16 Years

For 16 years, she has been the chaplain at Chapel Hill Community, a United Church Homes life plan community in Canal Fulton, Ohio, where she has officiated three weddings, six baptisms, 190 funerals and more than 800 Sunday worship services and Bible studies.

Sandy’s last day as chaplain was June 30. She plans to spend time with her family, possibly go to school with younger people and continue her years-long connection to United Church Homes and the United Church of Christ, which is in covenant with UCH.

“There’s always been some way I have been involved with United Church Homes. It’s such a strong ministry in Ohio. It’s a ministry that I’ve always felt connected with. I’m sure that will continue in some capacity,” Sandy said. “A significant part of my life is going to change. But since I set the date and turned in the letter, there’s been a calm assurance this is a good time to retire.”

During a recent retirement celebration at Chapel Hill, Sandy thanked UCH staff, residents, her family and others for their support during her years as chaplain, but said she will miss the friendships she’s developed with residents and their families.

“I’m a person who values relationships. I’ll miss the relationships and not being with the people,” Sandy said.

The families she’s comforted say she will be missed.

Rev. Mark Frey, who recently retired from Bath United Church of Christ, has known Sandy for 20 years. He said he was “delighted” when she became chaplain at Chapel Hill.

“It was an excellent choice by United Church Homes. She’s a people person. She also has a great connection with mature adults. She understands their concerns and needs,” Mark said.

Five members of Mark’s extended family lived at Chapel Hill during Sandy’s time as chaplain, including his parents and his wife’s parents. All five of them died in the last five years.

“She helped us through that. She has a loving spirit. She has words for the heart. She knows when to be available and when to back away,” he said.

Mark said they enjoyed chapel services where Sandy displayed her sense of humor and at times sang, despite pleas for her to stop. “Sandy cannot sing. They would all laugh about that. But her messages are good,” he joked.

Rev. Kenneth Daniel, president and CEO of United Church Homes, said UCH was blessed to have Sandy as one of its chaplains. He said she has proven she has the competence and compassion to do the job.

“She has the consideration, concern, empathy and the total capacity to feel what it is like to be in someone else’s skin,” Rev. Daniel said.

Rev. Beth Long-Higgins, executive director of the Ruth Frost Parker Center for Abundant Aging, said Sandy mentored her more than 30 years ago while she was in seminary and in the process of completing the requirements for ordination.

Beth described Sandy as a chaplain who is dedicated to the church and faithful to her calling.

“She is a wonderful pastor,” Beth said. “Her deep connections to the church and the history of United Church Homes, which goes back to her experience as a local church pastor long before she took the chaplain position at Chapel Hill, will be missed.”

Chapel Hill Administrator Debra Durbin also said Sandy will be missed.

“I think there’s going to be a huge void to fill. She has built so many relationships with family members, staff, residents as well as within the United Church of Christ. Those are all things that we’re really going to miss — the connections she has in the community,” Debra said.

But Sandy said there’s no doubt it’s time for her to retire.

“I had that inner sense that God was saying, ‘You’ve had a good ministry here, and that it’s time to move into the next phase of my life,’” said Sandy, who is 68. “For 42 years, I’ve been active in ministry (with UCC churches). I feel called to explore new opportunities.”